STEM fields in America should reflect the people they serve.

Black and Latinx people represent 13 and 18 percent of the U.S. population but comprise just 4 and 7 percent of new Ph.D.s in the natural sciences and engineering. The need to change the face of science, technology, and medicine has never been more urgent and UMBC Meyerhoff Scholars are at the leading edge. Meet our graduates and learn how you can add to The Ripple Effect.

STEM fields in America should reflect the people they serve.

Black and Latinx people represent 13 and 18 percent of the U.S. population but comprise just 4 and 7 percent of new Ph.D.s in the natural sciences and engineering. The need to change the face of science, technology, and medicine has never been more urgent and UMBC Meyerhoff Scholars are at the leading edge. Meet our graduates and learn how you can add to The Ripple Effect.

The Ripple Effect Is Real graphic showing circles pouring off of the phrase.

It Began With a Dream

The first class of Meyerhoff graduates with Robert Meyerhoff and Freeman Hrabowski, 1993.

When visionary philanthropist Robert Meyerhoff and Freeman Hrabowski, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, partnered in 1988 to address underrepresentation of Black researchers and professionals in science, technology, and medicine they had no idea how far the impact would reach.

Starting with a class of 19 undergraduates, the Meyerhoff Scholars Program is now an American epicenter for producing Black graduates who go on to earn STEM Ph.D. degrees—increasing diversity and equity in biomedical research, engineering, and other STEM fields.

Read about the earliest Meyerhoffs in the New York Times.


Success is Never Final

1,400

Scholars who have earned undergraduate degrees in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and social sciences.

#1

UMBC’s national rank in producing Black graduates who go on to earn Ph.D.s in natural sciences and engineering.

#1

UMBC’s national rank in producing Black graduates who go on to earn M.D./Ph.D. degrees.

800+

Meyerhoff Scholars who have earned graduate and professional degrees. 300 more are completing graduate degrees.

12+

Institutions across the country that have adapted the Meyerhoff Program model, from Penn State and UNC Chapel Hill to UC San Diego and UC Berkeley.

Meet Our Meyerhoff Class of 2021

This spring, we celebrate the 59 members of our Class of 2021 who embody this dream and stand poised to continue making lasting, necessary change as they go on to top graduate and professional programs at Johns Hopkins, Harvard, Berkeley, MIT, University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Maryland, Baltimore, to name a few.

Hear about our new graduates’ exciting plans.


How Can We Increase Diversity in STEM? Support Students
– by Samuel Patterson ’21, M29, and Jordan Troutman ’21, M29, in Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

Samuel Patterson ’21, M29, mathematics and statistics, economics

Rhodes Scholar, Oxford University, economics

Hana Flores ’21, M29, chemical engineering

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, biology

Autumn Cook ’21, M29, chemistry and gender, women’s, + sexuality studies

University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign, chemistry

Jordan Troutman ’21, M29, computer science, mathematics

Knight-Hennessy Scholar, Stanford University, computer science

UMBC Valedictorian

Our Alumni Are Changing the World

Here are just a few examples of how our Meyerhoff alumni are making their mark everywhere they go, breaking boundaries and opening doors for the next generation. Read about more Meyerhoff alumni here.

Kizzmekia Corbett, Ph.D.,
’08, M16

Assistant Professor, Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Developer of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine

Read More

Kafui Dzirasa, M.D., Ph.D.,
’01, M8

Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University

Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers recipient

Read More

Robert Deloatch, Ph.D.,
’11, M19

Human Factors Engineer, Apple, Inc.

Lead author on study of relationship between anxiety and social media use among test-taking college students

Read More

Chelsea Pinnix, M.D., Ph.D.,
’99, M7

Associate Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Director of the Radiation Oncology Residency at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center


Read More

Add to the Ripple Effect.

One generation opens doors…
So the next can break boundaries.
Support the growth of the next generation of Meyerhoffs.


Three decades ago, we invested in the Meyerhoff program because of its potential to catalyze change at UMBC and in the scientific community through a student-centered approach, and it’s done just that, enduring 30 years later as evidence of what’s possible. Only by taking the lessons we learn and adapting them in response will we transform the culture of STEM such that inclusivity becomes the norm, not the exception.

– Erin K. O’Shea, Ph.D.
President, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

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